i am so bored, so here are a bunch of resolutions

/ Thursday, 11 January 2018 / No comments:




Some idealistic goals which may or may not be achieved this year:


  • Work hard at work for a promotion - need to bill 100% by June end ; refer another acquaintance
  • Travel to Japan in August / September
  • Save 75% of income
  • Sketch and paint more
  • Read at least 5 books (yes this is how little I read and really shows how much time I pander away on Netflix...)
  • Read up on legal articles and updates re: corporate law, ECM
  • Fix and take better care of hair and skin (late 20s here we come!*)
*oh fuck this.


Tasmania in pictures - November 2017 - (Warning: I talk about oysters a lot)

/ Tuesday, 19 December 2017 / No comments:


Bruny Island Ferry. I would love to return another time to do a proper hike (and also dive into another dozen Bruny Island oysters. Tasmania is oyster-heaven.)
At MONA. I really enjoyed the layout of the museum and most of the installations (although it got a bit TOO much/ wanky at times - like what the heck was with the fish and dagger in the bowl.)
Entrance of MONA.
A majority of the museum is underground. They are opening a new wing of the museum next year, which is inspired by an Egyptian lighthouse built for Ptolemy I. It looks fucking insane - like something from the Valley of the Kings.
View from our place in Hobart, overlooking the harbour.
Excuse my face (I had crazy allergies / hay fever!)
Mount Wellington. Is it just me, or does this view have an uncanny resemblance to Queenstown, NZ?
The famous Wineglass Bay!
There was a 3 hr hike down to the beach, which we unfortunately didn't have the time for. I will definitely be back!
 Despite the looks of this gorgeous bay...it has a pretty dark history. Back during the whaling days, the water was said to have been red with the blood of the slaughtered whales, so it looked like a glass of full bodied red wine.
View from the cruise to Wineglass Bay.
The route on the way to the bay was VERY choppy (as in rollercoaster level choppy - no exaggeration, I felt my stomach drop every 10 seconds)
View of Cradle Mountain in the distance.
At the Christmas Hills Raspberry Farm
 Highly recommend this place for their pancakes and raspberry drinks. I also bought a cute little jam sounveier for a friend.
HNNNNG
Oyster heaven. I reckon we ate more than 12 dozen the whole trip (I'm drooling as I'm typing this).
This batch of  Pacific Oysters was from Lease 65. They were SUPER plump but I still enjoyed the Bruny Island ones much more - they had distinctive seafood-y sweetness and a creamy umami taste (similar to a good Sydney rock oyster)!
Dinner at Mudhouse in Launceston. Wallaby with scallop and crispy bacon! I think we got lucky ordering this dish (my mum's friends weren't wowed by the things they ordered)!
Honestly, Tasmania has AMAZING food and such fresh produce.

Bay of Fires.
Random note - we saw two youths skinny dipping here, in amongst the sightseers HAHA.
Vivid reds at the Bay of Fires. I believe the colour is caused by algae/lichens.
Up close, it felt like I was on Mars!
At Black Cow Bistro in Launceston. This place is a MUST DO for steak lovers.
Scotch fillet! Not pictured (but also delicious): American porterhouse and angus eye fillet. The potato gratin here was also FRICKING BOMB.
Classic shot of lavender ice-cream at Bridstowe Lavendar Farm.
Cataract Gorge in Launceston.

Glass ceilings

/ Thursday, 2 November 2017 / No comments:

I was having lunch with my colleagues this afternoon at Quay Bar, which overlooks Customs House in Circular Quay. We were discussing our plans for Christmas and New Years over our Friday schnitzel and beers.  One workmate mentioned her plans to go up coast with her family,  another mentioned her trip to Tasmania.  I said I was returning to Hong Kong to visit my aunt and sightsee, coupled with a short trip to Macau.


Unexpectedly, one of my colleagues mentioned that he really enjoyed Hong Kong and asked whether I had swum near Victoria Harbour. I said I hadn't. I thought it about it some more, and realised that it was a very strange question for a tourist to ask.  I asked if he had, to which he replied he had done so many times.


Turns out my colleague had grown up on Hong Kong, and his family were ex-pats from Australia.
He said that he lived in Discovery Bay as a child, to which my other friend immediately exclaimed was where her university friend lived (by this time I was thinking my god, the sons and daughters of ex-pats are everywhere). She then continued to recount her visit to Discovery Bay, getting off the ferry and being alarmed by the complete cultural shift. Her exact words were "suddenly there were all these white women with prams, and kids in ballet costumes".  I laughed it off at the time, but reflecting on it now (several hours after lunch), I can't help but feel the significance of this all.


My parents grew up in an era in Hong Kong where the British had control over its governance. It also meant there was a significant divide (both cultural and socio-economical) between ex-pats who lived in exclusive, affluent suburbs near Victoria Peak or in isolated communities in Discovery Bay. My mum and her sister grew up in poor suburbs of Macau during Portuguese occupation, before relocating to Hong Kong in her early childhood. Her sister lived for a few months in the infamous maze/ slum that was Kowloon Walled City, before it was demolished in the mid 1980s. Similarly, my dad grew up in Guangzhou and moved to Kowloon Island with his family in his teens. He re-sat the notoriously difficult Hong Kong university entrance exams three times before being accepted into his degree. My mum was the first person in her family to obtain a tertiary education. She finished high school in night classes, whilst working in a manufacturing factory.


My parents have endured so much to close the gap between them and us, and breach that glass ceiling between the haves and have-nots within one generation. It continues to amaze me that I can relate to, and largely enjoy, the same privileges as the sons and daughters of former Hong Kong expats, who honestly had it all. I can only thank two people in my life, who I don't nearly thank enough.











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